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Aaron Kosminsky

Some Other Time

My copy of The Alan Hull Songbook's Some Other Time arrived in today's post.

I'm in no great hurry to listen to it and would prefer to hear some opinions on the subject before I do.

Anyone?
Waldo

some other time

sorry can't help you A.K. still waiting for mine Sad
Aaron Kosminsky

Some Other Time

No doubt it will be along shortly. Thanks for replying anyway, Waldo.

I've still not listened to mine so I don't know what it's like. I must say that the titles don't hold out much promise, they don't show much imagination at all.
nothingbut

Waiting for mine. If it were here I wouldn't want to wait to hear the content.

Cant understand why you prefer not to listen till you've heard other peoples' opinions first.  It's whether you like that matters.

I don't worry about the title too much, "Winter Song", "January Song", "Song for the Bairns" are all just functional titles.  I listen to the song first, then go hunting for the title.
Derek

Some Other Time: A+ from me!

Just as you shouldn't judge a book by it's cover, you can't judge an album by it's song titles! The titles are presumably true to Alan's originals and, as such are of "Some Other Time", i.e. the late 1960s.

Received my CD/LP yesterday and I am stunned by the variety of material on offer, the arrangements and the performances.  I had heard some of the songs being performed live at the Mining Institute in Newcastle last year which whetted my appetite for this superb collection.

All I can say in you are in for a treat- here are reborn treasures to savour. Well done Dave and Ian for your painstaking time and effort transferring these gems from demo tape to fully fledged realisations.

It's clear Alan was influenced by many musical sources and his creativity shines through in these marvellous re-workings.
Aaron Kosminsky

Good point Derek,

I am judging a book by its cover amn't I?

Maybe I'll get round to listening next weekend. Maybe not. I do appreciate your enthusiastic assessment though.

This is such a big event - a rare occurrence in the LF diaspora these days - that I'm not sure I could take a disappointment.

I'll share my opinion on here when I have one!
nothingbut

The chat is on the songbook fb site Aaron.
Aaron Kosminsky

Facebook

Thanks Nothingbut,

I suspected as much!
Aaron Kosminsky

Some Other Time

I finally got round to listening to this CD this lunch time. I'm not sure what  I was the more afraid of - yet another crushing disappointment or having to admit to actually liking it.  

My immediate impressions - with the opening bars - were positive but it soon became apparent that this album is more piano orientated than I would have liked. If I had wanted Elton John, I would have bought Elton John.

Dave's vocal delivery holds up well throughout and it is to be doubted that anyone other than he could have interpreted this materially adequately in the absence of the great man himself.

This collection is probably worthwhile if only for the fact that we finally know whatever became of Clear White Light (I, one presumes).

Tracks 9 & 10 are obviously prototype versions of the song which eventually became When War is Over.  This helps to fuel a nagging sense that there is a reason why this material took almost half a century to see the light of day. To an extent at least, it is faithful to the spirit of scraping the bottom of the barrel which now mostly prevails on
Planet Lindisfarne. To state the obvious, it is aimed at a niche market to which, if I am true to myself, I no longer belong.

Will I give it another listen? Probably. Some Other Time.
Derek

Some Other Time: still A+ from me!

I’m impressed by an album which gets better and better with every listen and astounded by just how well these songs have been arranged and performed. Although I may be biased being a pianist (of dubious talent!) myself, I like the mix of keyboard and guitar led material.

The inspired sequencing also emphasises the variety of the material giving a flow of “dark and light” which strengthens the album as an end-to-end listen.  One moment which takes my breath away is the following of “Opposites” with “I Am And So Are You”- that harmonica!.  Also, the upbeat “Love Lasts Forever” contrasts effectively with the brooding “Clear White Light”. Intrigued why the former isn't on the LP although it would deserve release as a non-album single!

The Debussy-esque piano of “Wild Flowers” is a highlight superbly complemented by the violin, as are the jazzy chord changes of “Little Things”. “297 Words” also benefits from Alan’s incursions into chord sequences which others like The Kinks (“No Return”), Paul McCartney (“Step Inside Love”) were experimenting with at the time- and still sound fresh after all these years.   Elsewhere, we have Alan’s seemingly effortless capability of writing highly effective melodies to counterpoint his unique bitter-sweet lyrics.  

There’s also the snippets which could have formed the basis for released songs.  I agree the verse tune of “Personal History Book” resembles that of “When The War Is Over” while a piece of phrasing on “Click-Clock Tick-Tock” mirrors that on “For The Bairns” from Pipedream.

A uniformly strong album with not a weak, or even mediocre track in sight- and I trust it will gather the good reviews it deserves! Hopefully R2 "Rock'n'Reel" in particular will give it good coverage; I do not agree this is a niche market product but one that deserves far wider exposure as a work of art in itself.

Far from scraping the bottom of the barrel, I feel this album rightly unearths rough hewn gems which remained buried purely because Alan was so prolific and quickly moved on to fresh material. These have now been polished to perfection, the variety of instrumental arrangements is a major plus point, and we have a product which both celebrates Alan's past and updates it for future consumption by a new generation.
Waldo

some other time

Wow thanks for your excellent and fulsome review Derek. I have to await a birthday to get my copy Sad but you have certainly made me look forward to it, which at my age is quite an achievement Smile)
Aaron Kosminsky

Yes, great review, Derek!

My studied negativity was always calculated to stimulate discussion but I never imagined that anyone would come up with anything like this.

I'll give it another listen at the weekend, when I am more of a mood for it, I promise! Just one other criticism, if I may - a lyric sheet would have been great!
Derek

Lyrics

Many thanks both.

I agree a lyric sheet would have been very useful- particularly with the album as my eyes struggle with CD-sized offerings, but they are available here:-

http://www.alanhullsongbook.com/lyrics.html

Cheers,
Derek.
Derek

Lyrics

Many thanks both.

I agree a lyric sheet would have been very useful- particularly with the album as my eyes struggle with CD-sized offerings, but they are available here:-

http://www.alanhullsongbook.com/lyrics.html

Cheers,
Derek.
Waldo

some other time

The blurb on the Alan  Hull Songbook website states that this may be the first in a series of cd releases. Do we know how many unreleased sons were discovered?
Waldo

that would be "songs" Wink
Derek

I don't know how many songs but there are "120 or so quarter inch tapes". Prolific is the word.
Waldo

som other time

Wow! that is something to look forward to; lets hope they will continue this work:-)
Aaron Kosminsky

Snowman in June

Thanks for pointing that out, Derek, I should have thought of that.

The album will probably make a lot more sense now that I can read the lyrics, which, from a glance, are very characteristically Alan.

BTW, from my first cursory glance I notice that Alan came up with the 'Snowman' concept almost 20 years before Raymond Briggs!
Waldo

some other time

Well I just got my hands on my copy; one of 6 Cds received today. (music or whisky is a family birthday rule) and the first one I played was "some other time" I am no Allan Jones or even "Derek" so I shan't attempt a critical analysis on only one listen, but I will say that I was thrilled with what I heard. I have this on my play list on repeat now, and can only thank Dave and Ian for their excellent and painstaking work, and of course all of you guys on the blog for helping to keep the words and music of Alan and the Lindisfarne wider family alive. Long may it continue! Very Happy
Aaron Kosminsky

I kept the promise I made to Derek and listened to this CD again on Saturday.

There is of course a huge gamble involved in making a record like this - you have to stand in for Alan on vocals, guitar and piano and might very well fall well short of the mark, though that has not happened here.

My earlier comments were dismissive, churlish and undeserved. To that extent I apologise. The plain truth of the matter is that I almost never listen to Lindisfarne-related material these days and am struggling to get back into the genre.
Derek

Your initial comments galvanised me into writing a mini-review which otherwise I might still be getting round to!  After a few days away I revisited the album and am more convinced than ever we have a work with staying power. The latter half of the 1960s was especially remarkable for creativity which swept away boundaries between musical, literary and spiritual genres to often stunning effect- and Alan was obviously one of those at the forefront.  

The album is a remarkable achievement. seemingly effortlessly capturing the spirit of the times. However, much effort must have gone into the transcribing, arranging and performing to achieve that result.

George Harrison was a pioneer in setting spiritual texts during this era; here Alan Hull, in "297 Words", adventurously but effectively turns the "Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam" into song lyrics !
Aaron Kosminsky

Hi Derek,

I completely agree with your comments about the second half of the sixties, very well put. One of the things that struck me instantly about this album is that it is very true to the ethos and production values of the time in which it was written.

Your second paragraph reminds me again that it would have been very easy to have got this album completely and embarrassingly wrong, recording almost 50 years after it was written and without the immediate input of its creator.

However, Dave and Ian, their friend on violin, and of course Ron the producer, have really done it justice.
StuartG

Hi Aaron,

I'm pleased you're enjoying the album, after your initial reservations, some of which I shared. As you and Derek have commented, these songs were of their time. This isn't an early Lindisfarne album, and few if any could ever have made it into a Lindisfarne set list. Maybe there's a couple which may have morphed into something like When the War is Over (as Derek spotted) or something akin to Angels at Eleven. On first hearing, I was impressed by the musicianship and production, but not entirely struck by the songs. It's grown on me considerably. My particular favourite is emerging as Personal History Book. I'm also taken by the gutsy interpretation of I Am And So Are You. Quite different from the Affinity and Capabilty Brown covers, and inclusive, I think, of a hitherto unknown chorus (I'm not sure this part works, though). Overall, it strikes me that there's a lot more piano than guitar, possibly representing Alan's prime instrument of the time.

What caught my eye in particular is the range of instruments in Ian's toy store. Rather like Rod, it seems there's much more to this chap than "just" a bass player. It doesn't mention upright bass, probably inappropriate for the time setting, though it sounds as if it's played at times, and to good effect.

My only disappointment is that my iTunes has taken a dislike to it, so although it will play the cd, it won't upload so I can copy to the ipod.
Waldo

heh Stuart My copy uploaded just fine to Itunes do you know what the issue is? has this happened before? if I can help in anyway let me know.
Aaron Kosminsky

Hi Stuart,

Good to have your perspective. Yes, this album is Alan, long before Lindisfarne was even a twinkle in anyone's eye.

You're absolutely right, this is not a Lindisfarne album in any shape or form. Maybe that's why the songs got sidetracked, they just weren't right for the band.

Is there anything here you can imagine Jacka turning his hand to? As I recall, there was some rather excellent harmonica on at least one of the tracks.
StuartG

Hi Waldo,

Thanks for the offer. ITunes recognises the album and track listing, and will play it. But when I ask it to upload, I receive a message to say that a/the file can't be found. It's strange again because I uploaded it to Window Media Player ok, and have subsequently uploaded other albums to iTunes.


Hi Aaron,

Nothing stood  out as a potential Jacka song. I always regarded this as something of a qualifying test for a Lindisfarne song, but then, Alan sang nearly all of his songs himself.  The raunchy harmonica opens I Am And Etc, untypical of Dave's playing and not really Jacka's style either. Great stuff nevertheless.
Aaron Kosminsky

Hi Stuart,

Mind you, if you listen to Rod's solo version of MMOTC, it doesn't sound much like potential Jacka material either!
StuartG

I know what you mean. But then, it doesn't sound much like a Jacka song when I play it on the uke!
Aaron Kosminsky

Erm no, I don't suppose it would!
Derek

Interesting discussion about whether any of the songs could have been released on a Lindisfarne album. In the 1980s, the "Sleepless Nights", "Dance Your Life Away" and "Amigos" albums cast the net wider in terms of stylistic variety, often moving to a more mainstream approach, and there was also a blurring of Alan's solo and band output.

I think several of the songs could have merited a revival at this time and indeed "Golden Apples", another song from the early days, was tried out at the "Sleepless Nights" sessions and ended up on "Buried Treasures". Some songs enjoyed both a solo and band life, notably "Day Of The Jackal", "Heroes", "100 Miles to Liverpool" and "Malvinas Melody" whereas "Evergreen" was tried out for "Sleepless Nights" and ended up on "On The Other Side".   Accent was often on melody and this abounds on "Some Other Time"- "Love Lasts Forever" and "Personal History Book" are especially good examples of timeless tunes.
Waldo

Some other time

For those of you who do not subscribe to the music magazine "Uncut" the Spme other time album was rated a creditable 7/10 in the July edition. Nigel Williamson described the title track as "baroque chamber-rock Click-clock Tick-tock as "1960s pysch-pop", 297 words as "lovely folk rockism" and She as "Badfingerish" Whilst I personally dislike the "pigeon-hole speak" of the modern music critic, the piece was on the whole a positive appraisal, and ended with "it's testament to Hull's prolific talent that such burstingly melodic songs could be so easily discarded"

Anyone seen any other reviews?
Mick

Finally got a copy of this. I must admit, I wasn't sure what to expect, as often, there's a very good reason why an artist's unreleased songs were unreleased in the first place..... However, I'm pleasantly surprised by the quality of the songs and I'm now wondering what Alan's versions would have been like.

Dave and Ian have done a great job and I can't wait to see if there are any more in the pipeline.
Derek

R2 Rock'n'Reel Review

Excellent and fully deserved five star review of "Some Other Time" by Ian Taylor in the new July/August issue of R2 "Rock'n'Reel".
Mr Inbetween

Ian was bound to say good things, however well deserved!
PaulH

My copy arrived in the post today.
It has inspired me to finally join this list after lurking here for so many years
Hi all!
Its a great piece of work, no duff tracks at all.
I guess we will never hear the originals but I believe a great job has been done trying to re create the original sound and feeling of the songs .
I hope this one is well recieved so we will hear more in the future.
JimW

Re: Some Other Time

Aaron Kosminsky wrote:
I finally got round to listening to this CD this lunch time. I'm not sure what  I was the more afraid of - yet another crushing disappointment or having to admit to actually liking it.  

My immediate impressions - with the opening bars - were positive but it soon became apparent that this album is more piano orientated than I would have liked. If I had wanted Elton John, I would have bought Elton John.

Dave's vocal delivery holds up well throughout and it is to be doubted that anyone other than he could have interpreted this materially adequately in the absence of the great man himself.

This collection is probably worthwhile if only for the fact that we finally know whatever became of Clear White Light (I, one presumes).

Tracks 9 & 10 are obviously prototype versions of the song which eventually became When War is Over.  This helps to fuel a nagging sense that there is a reason why this material took almost half a century to see the light of day. To an extent at least, it is faithful to the spirit of scraping the bottom of the barrel which now mostly prevails on
Planet Lindisfarne. To state the obvious, it is aimed at a niche market to which, if I am true to myself, I no longer belong.

Will I give it another listen? Probably. Some Other Time.


Aaron, I remember you saying similar stuff about Lindisfarne in the past.  You might have been joking (in part) but I suspect from this latest post your thinking about the current Lindisfarne who you previously referred to as a tribute band is they've outstayed their welcome.  Obviously, there are people who disagree with you as there appears to still be an appetite for Lindisfarne music (new and old) and whilst I doubt I'll rush out to buy this CD myself I say each to their own.  As for scraping the barrel maybe if the hat fits....!!
billyb

song book

Really Enjoyed the Cd, Some Other Time"- "Love Lasts Forever" and "Personal History Book" are my Fav tracks. Lot of piano on the Cd. Does anybody know if a copy of the chords and lyrics is about any where.

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